A SOLDIER'S JOURNAL
With The 22nd Infantry Regiment in World War II

Publication Information

Author: David Rothbart

Front Jacket Cover of A Soldier's Journal

About A SOLDIER'S JOURNAL
by Senior Editor Dwight Jon Zimmerman

This is the extraordinary memoir of the 22nd
Infantry Regiment, a unit that Ernest Hemingway
stayed with for five months, from the drive
across France to the bloody Battle of the
Hurtgen Forest. It is a moving account of men
who enlisted to fight in a just cause. It touches
on the chaos of war and how accidental atrocities
--such as the use of poison gas by American
artillery on November 15, 1944--were narrowly
averted. In addition, it is a journal surprisingly
rich with humor--from how men learn all about "the
right way, the wrong way, and the Army way" to
those incongruous moments of comedy that can
occur even on the battlefield. The result is a
memoir so rich in character, detail, and atmosphere
that the reader will feel that he is shoulder-to-
shoulder with men from the "Greatest Generation."

By the Author:

Many memoirs have been written by World War II
veterans, most of them written years later. I
have never seen anything like my journal, which
was written at the time and place where every-
thing happened. I have been asked, what made me
decide to keep a journal. In advance of being
drafted I reasoned that much of a soldier's spare
time is spent in dreadful boredom. Gambling
never interested me, nor drinking. Writing would
provide me with an interesting preoccupation.



I was drafted into the U.S. Army on Valentine's
Day, February 14, 1942. I immediately started
keeping a journal. I wrote only when I thought
I had something interesting to record. The Journal
is in two parts. First, "One Year in the Army,
Stateside." The second part is "Overseas in
Europe with the 4th Infantry Division." The 4th
Infantry Division was one of the three assault
divisions that initiated five major battles in
Europe. The 22nd Infantry Regiment of the 4th
Infantry Division landed at Utah Beach on D-day, Normandy. We then swept through France,
Belgium, and Luxembourg. We fought in the battle
of Hurtgen Forest, which is widely known as one
of the fiercest, bloodiest battles in all history.
We entered into Germany, then fought in the
Battle of the Bulge. My 22nd Infantry Regiment,
one of the three regiments in the division, was
the one chosen by novelist Ernest Hemingway and journalist Ernie Pyle to spend their time with
during five combat months.

I was the T/​4 sergeant in charge of the
Classification Section of the 22nd Infantry
Regiment Personnel office. During combat it was
my job to assign replacements to depleted rifle companies and escort them on trucks to the meat-grinder front lines.

When I was inducted I understood that I was going
to be in the Army until we won the war, no matter
how long it took--two years, five, ten...
In May, 1945, 486 dated Journal entries after I was
inducted, the war in Europe ended. In July, 1945,
I, together with my division, headed for the port
of Le Havre. There we boarded the 10,000 ton US "Liberty" troopship James B. Parker and headed
for home.
Sgt David Rothbart, World War II 22nd Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, Mondorf, Luxembourg, December, 1944

A MILITARY BOOK CLUB FEATURED SELECTION

Publisher: iBooks, Inc.
Distributed By: Simon & Schuster
304 pages
Hardcover Price $23.95
ISBN: 0743458656

Paperback Price $12.95
ISBN: 1-59687-156-3

HISTORY/​ MILITARY/​
WORLD WAR II/​ GENERAL

THE MILITARY BOOK CLUB EDITOR'S REVIEW:

"A Soldier's Journal" takes you on a ride through WWII with the 4th Infantry Division, 22nd Infantry Regiment--one of the hardest working units in the ETO. Sgt. David Rothbart kept a journal throughout his training and wartime experience 57 years ago.

With a writing style full of detail, grace and humor, Rothbart was fittingly in the same regiment as Ernest Hemingway. As part of the regimental headquarters company, he had both a soldier's and a panoramic view of the war. He relates his comrade's stories of fierce combat during and after D-Day in as detailed a manner as his own tales of artillery barrages and Luftwaffe bombings. The result is one man's unique perspective of fighting in the ETO--a magnificent addition to the "oral history" of WWII.


THIS IS A FOUR-PAGE WEB SITE. CLICK ON EACH OF THE PAGE NUMBERS AT THE TOP OF THIS PAGE TO SEE ALL FOUR PAGES.

src="nowcircle10.gif border="0" alt="In Association with Amazon.com">

Find Authors